Evidence Based Practices

EVIDENCE  BASED  PRACTICE (EBP)

THE BASICS,
Second Edition:
A Curriculum for
Co-Occurring Psychiatric
and Substance Disorders
was literally designed to
put EBP into action and
implementation.

EBP

Integrated System of Care; Universal Dual Diagnosis Capabilities; Principles of Empathy and Hope; Motivational Interviewing Approach; Stages of Change Model Design; Strength Based; Skill Building; Solution Focused; Neurochemistry Based Disorders of the Brain; Symptom Identification; Symptoms Management; Best Practices Curriculum Topics, i.e.
Nutrition, Stress Management, Cognitive Behavioral, and much more…

Evidence based standards are now well established for the System, Program Design and Guidelines, Clinical Practice Content, Approach, Relationship, and integrated treatment of the Person with co-occurring psychiatric and substance disorders.

BUILDING THE BASICS

The  Basics,  Second  Edition:  A  Curriculum  for  Co-Occurring Psychiatric and Substance Disorders was built from the foundation up. It was built level by level to support and reach our goal – providing services to the person with co-occurring psychiatric and substance disorders.

The terms “best practice standards” and more recently “evidence based practices” have become a part of our daily vocabulary. Fully integrated services has been identified as both – best practice standards and evidenced based practices – by distinguished organizations, as well as individual experts nationally and internationally.

The Basics, Second Edition is EBP (Evidence Based Practices) for the treatment of persons with co-occurring psychiatric and substance disorders. All program content in the curriculum is based on and supported by evidence-based, research-based, and consensus-based best practices, as well as the principles of successful treatment for individuals with co-occurring disorders. The Basics, Second Edition was developed in its entirety to align with:

  • The EBP (1,600 references cited in McKillip, R. 2004) treatment of persons with co-occurring psychiatric and substance disorders.
  • The 1998 Co-Occurring Psychiatric and Substance Disorders in Managed Care Systems: Standards of Care, Practice Guidelines, Workforce Competencies, and Training Curricula, developed through The Center for Mental Health Services Managed Care Initiative: Clinical Standards and Workforce Competencies Project by the Co-Occurring Mental and Substance Disorders Panel of National Dual Diagnosis Experts.
  • The CCISC (Comprehensive Continuous Integrated System of Care) model (Minkoff & Cline, 2004) is recognized by SAMHSA (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration) as EBP for systems implementation of the treatment of ICOPSD (Integrated Treatment of Individuals with Co-Occurring Psychiatric and Substance Disorders).

Dual diagnosis experts state in these references that the goal is for clinicians to develop basic knowledge of psychiatric and substance disorders and their interactions, and the skills to be able to consistently demonstrate familiarity with an integrated disease and recovery model. The goal of providing quality and comprehensive psychoeducational curricula is also addressed in these reports, as well as from numerous other national and international professionals, combined with our own ethical standards of service delivery.

To highlight a few, the curriculum is purposely designed to:

  • Follow the Stages of Change Model (Prochaska, Norcross & DiClemente, 1994).
  • Interweave carefully and purposefully into the text and the handouts the specific principles set forth in EBP of counselor values, attitudes, and beliefs (Co-Occurring Psychiatric and Substance Disorders in Managed Care Systems: Standards of Care, Practice Guidelines, Workforce Competencies, and Training Curricula, 1998).
  • Include, from the beginning to the end, the most significant predictors for treatment success of empathy and hope (Minkoff, 1998).
  • Incorporate the most important counselor qualities of maintaining a consistent, nonjudgmental, and positive attitude (Montrose & Daley, 1995).
  • Match in approach and “spirit” the principles of Motivational Interviewing (Miller & Rollnick, 2002).
  • Integrate specific treatment topics and program content set forth in the 1998 Report from the Panel of National Experts and hundreds upon hundreds of other references and resources (complete bibliography available at the back of each subject in the curriculum).
  • Detail (using conversational language) the neurochemistry information and symptommanagement, of dual diagnoses from the NIMH (National Institute of Mental Health) & NIDA (National Institute on Drug Abuse) studies generated from the “Decade of the Brain” and continue to be further supported in the current research.

In other words, the entire curriculum is designed to help clinicians implement and put into practice EBP in the treatment setting. For instance: